The Song they Sang

We were almost falling asleep when we heard her laugh burst through the empty abandoned hallways of the building. It was a high pitched contagious laughter that cracked like dry twigs. We had never heard that laugh before and so we rushed to our windows and pressed our eyes and ears on the panes hoping … Continue reading The Song they Sang

Major Contribution

Your parents must have been really proud when you came tearing into the world. Matching in like we owed you money. Screaming. They must have stared at your little soft face and rosy cheeks like the inside of a rose and had their hearts melt like wax from a candle. You were finally here, welcome, … Continue reading Major Contribution

Zero to a Hundred

The message came late on Friday night. It was extreme in brevity, inconsistent and rushed, like a shopping list mother would write down before dashing to the market. The message read…   I relate to your stories but I do not know in what way. I saved this on a notepad. Ask me for a … Continue reading Zero to a Hundred

Who is your Family?

It is a huge table under a gazebo behind a tall building. A silent, calm and serene atmosphere. We are having lunch and everything is so peaceful apart from occasional bursts from Kamotho about discipline.   “When I ask a question, I expect an answer. I like responses just like you do because we are … Continue reading Who is your Family?

Coffee Shops by Mukiri Gitiri

For the first time, last week on Monday, I felt a thrill similar to that of my first kiss. He could argue that it was the second but well, that one was on my eighteenth birthday and it is a story I am told. My first kiss was a sober one. I remember feeling so … Continue reading Coffee Shops by Mukiri Gitiri

Coffee Runs Out

It has now been two weeks since I hang my coat and quit my job to become a full-time writer. I will not lie, some nights I lay awake staring at the ceiling wondering whether I made the right decision. Some mornings, I have had a difficult time affording a smile but I have pushed … Continue reading Coffee Runs Out

One Half the Conversation

A conversation in the car between me and dad is always a welcome idea. The best part about such conversations is that he has to keep his eyes on the road when I break outrageous news like "I quit my job" and "I am getting married". He would wish he was glaring at me and … Continue reading One Half the Conversation

The Last Party

It was not even raining when they came. There was nothing to indicate the impending doom that would change our lives forever. When I set my memory back in time, 15th August 2018, I remember I was in a public transport vehicle, riding past Karura Forest at Kiambu Road, I remember a deceptively bucolic atmosphere … Continue reading The Last Party

Our Last Name

My parents arrived on a Saturday, a few hours shy of midday. They came bearing maize floor, fresh from the kisiagi, boiled sweet potatoes and millet porridge in a five-litre kibuyu. They said that a little bird had whispered to them back in the village, told them of my transgressions in the city, and they … Continue reading Our Last Name

Bachelor Dens

  You stand there when the storm comes. You smile at her. You make promises of assurance. She calms down. You look at her and see the green in her eyes, and you set your camp on her conscious.   In your solitude, your blankets rise in your bachelor den every morning and you wish … Continue reading Bachelor Dens