Welcome to Fellowship

Any good story of transformation begins with a friend inviting another for a fellowship one easy late afternoon after a heavy lunch. How it happens is neither imploring nor compelling, in fact, it is as calm and unwitty as a political handshake, at least for you. It happens as it would to a different friend … Continue reading Welcome to Fellowship

Tragedy beyond Death

I think about death. Sometimes more often than not, other times too continually that it is alarming. I think about my death the most. I was once fascinated with how my eulogy would be like, I even wrote about it (read here). Not much has changed, I still think my eulogy should look nice with … Continue reading Tragedy beyond Death

Zero to a Hundred

The message came late on Friday night. It was extreme in brevity, inconsistent and rushed, like a shopping list mother would write down before dashing to the market. The message read…   I relate to your stories but I do not know in what way. I saved this on a notepad. Ask me for a … Continue reading Zero to a Hundred

Who is your Family?

It is a huge table under a gazebo behind a tall building. A silent, calm and serene atmosphere. We are having lunch and everything is so peaceful apart from occasional bursts from Kamotho about discipline.   “When I ask a question, I expect an answer. I like responses just like you do because we are … Continue reading Who is your Family?

A Driving Force

You can almost always tell whether someone is a storyteller or not. Storytellers have this atmosphere around them that they carry everywhere they go and when they take a seat, their stories pull up the seat next to them. Such people do not even ask questions or wait for your contribution. They just dive right … Continue reading A Driving Force

Coffee Shops by Mukiri Gitiri

For the first time, last week on Monday, I felt a thrill similar to that of my first kiss. He could argue that it was the second but well, that one was on my eighteenth birthday and it is a story I am told. My first kiss was a sober one. I remember feeling so … Continue reading Coffee Shops by Mukiri Gitiri

Coffee Runs Out

It has now been two weeks since I hang my coat and quit my job to become a full-time writer. I will not lie, some nights I lay awake staring at the ceiling wondering whether I made the right decision. Some mornings, I have had a difficult time affording a smile but I have pushed … Continue reading Coffee Runs Out

One Half the Conversation

A conversation in the car between me and dad is always a welcome idea. The best part about such conversations is that he has to keep his eyes on the road when I break outrageous news like "I quit my job" and "I am getting married". He would wish he was glaring at me and … Continue reading One Half the Conversation

Our Last Name

My parents arrived on a Saturday, a few hours shy of midday. They came bearing maize floor, fresh from the kisiagi, boiled sweet potatoes and millet porridge in a five-litre kibuyu. They said that a little bird had whispered to them back in the village, told them of my transgressions in the city, and they … Continue reading Our Last Name

Mark and Baby

  For obvious reasons, my cousin and I always met in a bar in town. In fact, I got to know him through a bar, unlike everyone else who is introduced to their relatives in family gatherings. So, yes, this is like the vice versa of that story that you know, the one that ends … Continue reading Mark and Baby